Epitome of Art

Art is Universal beyond borders.
polarized:

Even though it’s unconfirmed, it sank my heart though D:
#MH370ForeverInOurHearts

polarized:

Even though it’s unconfirmed, it sank my heart though D:

#MH370ForeverInOurHearts

MH370: The missing flight

presumenothing:

Official updates from MAS can be found on their website and twitter; families of those onboard should call +603 7884 1234 (Malaysia) or +8610 6437 6249 (Beijing) for further info. An unofficial, frequently updated timeline of events can be found here.

Last updated: 10 March, 11pm. All times are in Malaysian local time, UTC/GMT+8:00.

EDIT: In the short time since posting, this post has received many hits from around the world. I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to read this, for sharing this with your followers, and most of all for caring, even if this incident doesn’t directly concern you. Thank you.

What is MH370?
MH370 is a Malaysian Airlines (MAS) codeshare flight with China Southern Airlines CZ748 that departed from Kuala Lumpur (the capital of Malaysia) at 12.41am on 8 March, and was expected to land in Beijing at 6.30am on the same day. It was operated on a Boieng 777-200ER and carried enough fuel to fly until 8.30am.

What happened to it?
Subang Air Traffic Control (in Malaysia) lost contact with MH370 as it was just about to hand over to Ho Chi Minh Air Traffic Control Centre (in Vietnam) at 1.22am, and reported it missing to MAS at 2.40am. The last known position of MH370 before it disappeared from radar was 6°55′15″ North and 103°34′43″ East, while flying over the Gulf of Thailand at an altitude of 35,000 feet. No distress call, ELT (emergency locator transmitter) or other signal was detected. Authorities from China and Thailand stated that MH370 did not enter their airspace.

Read More

hiro-too:

Missing Plane: A Malaysia Airlines plane carrying 239 passengers lost contact with air traffic control operators en route to Beijing. Please send your prayers out to these innocent people and hope that they are safe now.

Flight MH370 left Kuala Lumpur for Beijing early Saturday morning, but vanished off radar screens less than an hour later. As night fell in the region, there still was no sign of the missing jet — and increasing likelihood that it had crashed into the sea.

My prayers for the passenger’s and their famalies of Malaysia Airlines MH370

neurosciencestuff:

People worldwide may feel mind-body connections in same way
Many phrases reflect how emotions affect the body: Loss makes you feel “heartbroken,” you suffer from “butterflies” in the stomach when nervous, and disgusting things make you “sick to your stomach.”
Now, a new study from Finland suggests connections between emotions and body parts may be standard across cultures.
The researchers coaxed Finnish, Swedish and Taiwanese participants into feeling various emotions and then asked them to link their feelings to body parts. They connected anger to the head, chest, arms and hands; disgust to the head, hands and lower chest; pride to the upper body; and love to the whole body except the legs. As for anxiety, participants heavily linked it to the mid-chest.
"The most surprising thing was the consistency of the ratings, both across individuals and across all the tested language groups and cultures," said study lead author Lauri Nummenmaa, an assistant professor of cognitive neuroscience at Finland’s Aalto University School of Science.
However, one U.S. expert, Paul Zak, chairman of the Center for Neuroeconomics Studies at Claremont Graduate University in California, was unimpressed by the findings. He discounted the study, saying it was weakly designed, failed to understand how emotions work and “doesn’t prove a thing.”
But for his part, Nummenmaa said the research is useful because it sheds light on how emotions and the body are interconnected.
"We wanted to understand how the body and the mind work together for generating emotions," Nummenmaa said. "By mapping the bodily changes associated with emotions, we also aimed to comprehend how different emotions such as disgust or sadness actually govern bodily functions."
For the study, published online Dec. 30 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers showed two silhouettes of bodies to about 700 people. Depending on the experiment, they tried to coax feelings out of the participants by showing them emotional words, stories, clips from movies and facial expressions. Then the participants colored the silhouettes to reflect the body areas they felt were becoming most or least active.
The idea was to not mention emotions directly to the participants but instead to make them “feel different emotions,” Nummenmaa said.
The researchers noted that some of the emotions may cause activity in specific areas of the body. For example, most basic emotions were linked to sensations in the upper chest, which may have to do with breathing and heart rate. And people linked all the emotions to the head, suggesting a possible link to brain activity.
But Zak said the study failed to consider that people often feel more than one emotion at a time. Or that a person’s own comprehension of emotion can be misleading since the “areas in the brain that process emotions tend to be largely outside of our conscious awareness,” he said.
It would make more sense, Zak said, to directly measure activity in the body, such as sweat and temperature, to make sure people’s perceptions have some basis in reality. Nummenmaa said he expects future research to go in that direction.
How might the current research be useful? Zak is skeptical that it could be, but the study lead author is hopeful.
"Many mental disorders are associated with altered functioning of the emotional system, so unraveling how emotions coordinate with the minds and bodies of healthy individuals is important for developing treatments for such disorders,” Nummenmaa said.
Next, the researchers want to see if these emotion-body connections change in people who are anxious or depressed. “Also, we are interested in how children and adolescents experience their emotions in their bodies,” Nummenmaa said.

neurosciencestuff:

People worldwide may feel mind-body connections in same way

Many phrases reflect how emotions affect the body: Loss makes you feel “heartbroken,” you suffer from “butterflies” in the stomach when nervous, and disgusting things make you “sick to your stomach.”

Now, a new study from Finland suggests connections between emotions and body parts may be standard across cultures.

The researchers coaxed Finnish, Swedish and Taiwanese participants into feeling various emotions and then asked them to link their feelings to body parts. They connected anger to the head, chest, arms and hands; disgust to the head, hands and lower chest; pride to the upper body; and love to the whole body except the legs. As for anxiety, participants heavily linked it to the mid-chest.

"The most surprising thing was the consistency of the ratings, both across individuals and across all the tested language groups and cultures," said study lead author Lauri Nummenmaa, an assistant professor of cognitive neuroscience at Finland’s Aalto University School of Science.

However, one U.S. expert, Paul Zak, chairman of the Center for Neuroeconomics Studies at Claremont Graduate University in California, was unimpressed by the findings. He discounted the study, saying it was weakly designed, failed to understand how emotions work and “doesn’t prove a thing.”

But for his part, Nummenmaa said the research is useful because it sheds light on how emotions and the body are interconnected.

"We wanted to understand how the body and the mind work together for generating emotions," Nummenmaa said. "By mapping the bodily changes associated with emotions, we also aimed to comprehend how different emotions such as disgust or sadness actually govern bodily functions."

For the study, published online Dec. 30 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers showed two silhouettes of bodies to about 700 people. Depending on the experiment, they tried to coax feelings out of the participants by showing them emotional words, stories, clips from movies and facial expressions. Then the participants colored the silhouettes to reflect the body areas they felt were becoming most or least active.

The idea was to not mention emotions directly to the participants but instead to make them “feel different emotions,” Nummenmaa said.

The researchers noted that some of the emotions may cause activity in specific areas of the body. For example, most basic emotions were linked to sensations in the upper chest, which may have to do with breathing and heart rate. And people linked all the emotions to the head, suggesting a possible link to brain activity.

But Zak said the study failed to consider that people often feel more than one emotion at a time. Or that a person’s own comprehension of emotion can be misleading since the “areas in the brain that process emotions tend to be largely outside of our conscious awareness,” he said.

It would make more sense, Zak said, to directly measure activity in the body, such as sweat and temperature, to make sure people’s perceptions have some basis in reality. Nummenmaa said he expects future research to go in that direction.

How might the current research be useful? Zak is skeptical that it could be, but the study lead author is hopeful.

"Many mental disorders are associated with altered functioning of the emotional system, so unraveling how emotions coordinate with the minds and bodies of healthy individuals is important for developing treatments for such disorders,” Nummenmaa said.

Next, the researchers want to see if these emotion-body connections change in people who are anxious or depressed. “Also, we are interested in how children and adolescents experience their emotions in their bodies,” Nummenmaa said.

punsicle:

have you ever stayed up late with someone texting or chatting and known as the hours ticked by that you’d be ridiculously tired in the morning but it didnt matter because it was really fun and totally worth losing sleep over just to laugh with someone and enjoy their company maybe and then the next day you keep tiredly recalling how much fun it was while you’re falling asleep in class and that makes it not so bad that you’re tired anymore

(Source: zachabee-deactivated654323, via thesuedeshade)

"Always a bridesmaid, never a bride , my foot" He said upon receiving the 2003 oscar Honorary Awards.
“Whose remarkable talents have provided cinema history with some of its most memorable characters.” - Peter O’Toole’s Honorary Oscar inscription.
A superb virtuoso talent as such of the legendary Mr O’Toole , is impossible to be topped by any other man. His personality, and his voice.. my God that voice is a treasure.  So long Mr O’Toole, u will always be remembered as the star, the shining light, the master. U left us your magnificent legacy right from the 60s up till today (in 2014 too, will be a film of his ,posthumously released i believe so). 
Goodbye Mr Chips. May u rest in peace , with such of  Richard Harris and Richard Burton up there.

"Always a bridesmaid, never a bride , my foot" He said upon receiving the 2003 oscar Honorary Awards.
“Whose remarkable talents have provided cinema history with some of its most memorable characters.” - Peter O’Toole’s Honorary Oscar inscription.

A superb virtuoso talent as such of the legendary Mr O’Toole , is impossible to be topped by any other man. His personality, and his voice.. my God that voice is a treasure.  So long Mr O’Toole, u will always be remembered as the star, the shining light, the master. U left us your magnificent legacy right from the 60s up till today (in 2014 too, will be a film of his ,posthumously released i believe so).

Goodbye Mr Chips. May u rest in peace , with such of  Richard Harris and Richard Burton up there.

artemisdreaming:

.

I will not be a common man. I will stir the smooth sands of monotony.

.

Peter Seamus Lorcan O’Toole  

2 August 1932 – 14 December 2013 

rareaudreyhepburn:

Audrey Hepburn and Peter O’Toole in How to Steal a Million, Paris, France, 1965.

Actor Peter O’Toole died at age 81 on Saturday in London.  August 2, 1932 – December 14, 2013.

Nicole Bonnet: You’re mad. Utterly mad. I suppose you want to kiss me goodnight?

Simon Dermott: Oh, I don’t usually, not on the first acquaintance, but you’ve been such a good sport…

(How to Steal a Million, 1966)

Wonderful.

(Source: rareaudreyhepburn)